Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

UC Berkeley’s library buildings are open. Here’s what you need to know.

ISF 189: Thesis Preparation : Reading citations

Strategies for preparing to write an ISF thesis.

How to Read a Journal Article Citation

chrecker, E. (2003). The Free speech movement: Reflections on Berkeley in the 1960s. Pacific Historical Review. 72 (4)  669-670.


The animation above shows an article cited in the APA format (view non-animated version). 

To distinguish an article from other kinds of sources, look for:

  • A journal title in addition to an article title
  • Numbers for volume and/or issue, and sometime issue dates or seasons (e.g. Spring 2014).
  • Page numbers
  • No place of publication or publisher name is listed

Citations for articles accessed online often list the article's stable URL at the end of the citation:

  • Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/phr.2003.72.4.669

How to Read a Book Citation

Goines, D. L. (1993). The Free speech movement: Coming of  age in the 1960's. Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed Press.


The animation above shows a book cited in the APA format (view non-animated version). 

To distinguish a book from other kinds of sources, look for:

  • Place of publication (e.g. Berkeley, CA)
  • Publisher name (e.g. Ten Speed Press)
  • No dates, other than a year, are usually included

How to Read a Book Chapter Citation

Hayles, N.K. (2014). Print Is Flat, Code Is Deep: The Importance of Media-Specific Analysis. In M. Kinder, T. McPherson, &, N.K. Hayles (Eds.), Transmedia Frictions: The Digital, the Arts, and the Humanities (pp. 20-33). Oakland, CA: University of California Press.


The animation above shows a single chapter from a book cited in the APA format (view non-animated version). 

To distinguish a book chapter from other kinds of sources, look for:

  • Chapter/essay title and book title
  • Author and editor name(s)
  • Page numbers for the chapter
  • Publisher name and place of publication