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College Writing 4B: Stories of Sustainability, Fall 2019: Reading and Managing Citations

instructor: Freeman

How to Avoid Plagiarism

In order to avoid plagiarism, you must give credit when

  • You use another person's ideas, opinions, or theories.
  • You use facts, statistics, graphics, drawings, music, etc., or any other type of information that does not comprise common knowledge.
  • You use quotations from another person's spoken or written word.
  • You paraphrase another person's spoken or written word.

Recommendations

  • Begin the writing process by stating your ideas; then go back to the author's original work.
  • Use quotation marks and credit the source (author) when you copy exact wording.
  • Use your own words (paraphrase) instead of copying directly when possible.
  • Even when you paraphrase another author's writings, you must give credit to that author.
  • If the form of citation and reference are not correct, the attribution to the original author is likely to be incomplete. Therefore, improper use of style can result in plagiarism. Get a style manual and use it.
  • The figure below may help to guide your decisions.

 

This content is part of the Understanding Plagiarism tutorial created by the Indiana University School of Education.

Citation managers

Reference managers (also called citation managers or bibliographic management software) offer a way to save, organize and manage references. Many work with word processing software to format in-text citations and bibliographies for papers and theses, allow you to share references, and enable you to attach or link PDFs to a citation record.

Wikipedia comparison of reference management software

RefWorks

  • Free to UC Berkeley users
  • Web-based: use at any computer with internet access
  • Format bibliographies in Word
  • Import citations from RSS feeds
  • Use UC-eLinks to find the full text of articles from within RefWorks
  • Share lists of references or create a group account for co-editing
  • From ProQuest

Zotero

  • Free (up to 300 MB web storage) browser extension
  • Sync Zotero to access your library from any computer with internet access
  • Format bibliographies in Word and OpenOffice
  • Capture citation data from PDFs and web pages
  • Share and collaboratively edit lists of references
  • Open source software from the Center for History and New Media, George Mason University
Mendeley
  • Free (up to 1 GB web storage) software/web hybrid for PC, Mac, Linux
  • Format bibliographies in Word or Open Office
  • Sync PDFs to your web account for online access
  • Capture citation data from some PDFs
  • Search and annotate PDFs
  • Share and collaboratively edit lists of references
  • From Elsevier
EndNote
  • Discounted to UC Berkeley users
  • Desktop-based software (plus EndNote Web)
  • Format bibliographies in Word or Open Office
  • Capture citation data from some PDFs
  • Annotate PDFs
  • Use UC-eLinks to find the full text of articles from within EndNote
  • Share lists of references with other EndNote users
  • See our EndNote Support page for tutorials and additional information
  • From Thomson Reuters

How to Read a Journal Article Citation

chrecker, E. (2003). The Free speech movement: Reflections on Berkeley in the 1960s. Pacific Historical Review. 72 (4)  669-670.


The animation above shows an article cited in the APA format (view non-animated version). 

To distinguish an article from other kinds of sources, look for:

  • A journal title in addition to an article title
  • Numbers for volume and/or issue, and sometime issue dates or seasons (e.g. Spring 2014).
  • Page numbers
  • No place of publication or publisher name is listed

Citations for articles accessed online often list the article's stable URL at the end of the citation:

  • Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/phr.2003.72.4.669

How to Read a Book Citation

Goines, D. L. (1993). The Free speech movement: Coming of  age in the 1960's. Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed Press.


The animation above shows a book cited in the APA format (view non-animated version). 

To distinguish a book from other kinds of sources, look for:

  • Place of publication (e.g. Berkeley, CA)
  • Publisher name (e.g. Ten Speed Press)
  • No dates, other than a year, are usually included

How to Read a Book Chapter Citation

Hayles, N.K. (2014). Print Is Flat, Code Is Deep: The Importance of Media-Specific Analysis. In M. Kinder, T. McPherson, &, N.K. Hayles (Eds.), Transmedia Frictions: The Digital, the Arts, and the Humanities (pp. 20-33). Oakland, CA: University of California Press.


The animation above shows a single chapter from a book cited in the APA format (view non-animated version). 

To distinguish a book chapter from other kinds of sources, look for:

  • Chapter/essay title and book title
  • Author and editor name(s)
  • Page numbers for the chapter
  • Publisher name and place of publication
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