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On the Same Page 2019: There There: Home

On the Same Page gives new students (and everyone else!) at Cal something to talk about

Land Acknowledgement

The curators of this exhibit recognize that Berkeley sits on the territory of Huichin, the ancestral and unceded land of the Chochenyo Ohlone, the successors of the historic and sovereign Verona Band of Alameda County. This land was and continues to be of great importance to the Ohlone people. We recognize that every member of the Berkeley community has, and continues to benefit from the use and occupation of this land, since the institution’s founding in 1868. Consistent with our values of community and diversity, we have a responsibility to acknowledge and make visible the university’s relationship to Native peoples. By offering this Land Acknowledgement, we affirm Indigenous sovereignty and will work to hold the University of California, Berkeley more accountable to the needs of American Indian and Indigenous peoples.

    -                                                                                                                                                                                - Borrowed with thanks from the Native American Student Development Office

On the Same Page 2019

On the Same Page gives new students (and everyone else!) at Cal something to talk about. This year, we're all on the same page reading There There by Tommy Orange.  Learn more about the novel, the author, special events and courses relating to the theme.

Print copies of the book in UCB libraries:  here, here, and here.  Also:  Ebook (UCB students/staff/faculty only)  and audio book (UCB students/staff/faculty only).
 

There There book cover

About the Book and the Author

“Orange’s debut is an ambitious meditation on identity and its broken alternatives, on myth filtered through the lens of time and poverty and urban life. Its many short chapters are told through a loosely connected group of Native Americans living in Oakland, Calif., as they travel to a powwow. They are all, as in Chaucer, pilgrims on their way to a shrine, or, as in Faulkner’s “As I Lay Dying,” an extended family crossing the landscape. The novel is their picaresque journey, allowing for moments of pure soaring beauty to hit against the most mundane, for a sense of timelessness to be placed right beside a clear eyed version of the here and now.”

                                                                                                                   -- “The 10 Best Books of 2018”, New York Times, November 29, 2018

 

Tommy Orange author photo

Tommy Orange

A recent graduate from the MFA program at the Institute of American Indian Arts, Tommy Orange is a 2014 MacDowell Fellow, and a 2016 Writing by Writers Fellow. He is an enrolled member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma. He was born and raised in Oakland, California,  and currently lives in Angel’s Camp, California.

 

Contact Melissa

Melissa Stoner's picture
Melissa Stoner
Contact:
Ethnic Studies Library
30 Stephens Hall #2360
Berkeley, CA 94720-2360
510-642-0941
Website
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