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You can still access the UC Berkeley Library’s services and resources during the closure. Here’s how.

OOMPH Library Resources: First On-Campus Week & PHW 200E: Keep Track of Your Citations

Citing and Keeping Track of Citations

EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero, Mendeley, and other bibliographic management programs will:
    - Let you create a database of citations you find;
    - Let you organize these citations in folder or groups
    - Link to PDF files, or store PDF files in your database;
    - Work with Microsoft Word to correctly cite citations into your document
      (some also work with Google Docs or Apple Pages);
    - Allow for some degree of sharing.
(Tips for collaborating with citation software)

You can download a free 30 day EndNote trial and can purchase EndNote at a discount.

RefWorks is licensed by the UCB Library and is free to use for UCB students.

Zotero and Mendeley are free; use your UC Berkeley email when creating a Mendeley account for more features.

Learn how to use these programs:
» EndNote exercise set (docx)
» RefWorks exercise set (docx)
» Zotero exercise set (docx)
» Mendeley exercise set

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Literature Review Matrix (.doc):
This chart may help you organize what you find in your literature search.
This is a simplified version of the matrix presented in
Health sciences literature review made easy: the matrix method (J. Garrard; 2017), available online from the UC Berkeley Library.

You can use software like Zotero (etc.) or Excel for organizing your literature search as well

Save your search strategies
Nearly all the databases you use to find articles, etc., retain your search history. Literature reviews, like epidemiological research, should be rigorous and reproducible. Save or print your search history to help document your search strategy, which will include:

  • the date of the search,
  • search terms used (keywords, title words, MeSHs, thesaurus terms, descriptors),
  • any limits (eg, language, publication dates) that you placed on your search.
  • how many relevant citations you found in each database.

Using PubMed's Clipboard and My NCBI can help with both saving your search strategy and the citations you find. See links on the PubMed Tips Guide

How to Avoid Plagiarism

In order to avoid plagiarism, you must give credit when

  • You use another person's ideas, opinions, or theories.
  • You use facts, statistics, graphics, drawings, music, etc., or any other type of information that does not comprise common knowledge.
  • You use quotations from another person's spoken or written word.
  • You paraphrase another person's spoken or written word.

Recommendations

  • Begin the writing process by stating your ideas; then go back to the author's original work.
  • Use quotation marks and credit the source (author) when you copy exact wording.
  • Use your own words (paraphrase) instead of copying directly when possible.
  • Even when you paraphrase another author's writings, you must give credit to that author.
  • If the form of citation and reference are not correct, the attribution to the original author is likely to be incomplete. Therefore, improper use of style can result in plagiarism. Get a style manual and use it.