Skip to main content

Native American Studies: What are Primary Sources?

Primary Sources

What are Primary Sources?

Primary sources are...

Primary Sources

Primary sources are records of events as they are first described, usually by witnesses or people who were involved in the event. Many primary sources were created at the time of the event but can also include memoirs, oral interviews, or accounts that were recorded later. 

Visual materials, such as photos, original artwork, posters, and films are important primary sources, not only fr the factual information they contain, but also for the insight they may provide into how people view their world. Primary sources may also include sets of data, such as census statistics, which have been tabulated but not interpreted. However, in the sciences or social sciences, primary sources report the results of an experiment. 

Primary vs. Secondary Sources

Secondary sources offer an analysis or a restatement of primary sources. They often attempt to describe or explain primary sources. Some secondary sources not only analyze primary sources, but also use them to argue a contention or persuade the reader to hold a certain opinion. Examples of secondary sources include dictionaries, encyclopedias, textbooks, books, and articles that interpret, analyze, or review research works. 

Examples

Examples of Primary and Secondary Sources

Subject Examples

Primary Source Secondary Source
Art original artwork article critiquing the piece of art
Literature poem book or article on a particular genre of poetry
Political Science treaty essay on Native American land rights
Science or Social Sciences report of an original experiment review of several studies on the same topic
Theater videotape of a performance biography of a play wright

 

Helpful Links

Copyright © 2014-2016 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. Except where otherwise noted, this work is subject to a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License.