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Moffitt Library is open, and other libraries have updated services and hours. Here’s what you need to know.

Optometry Residents: Start

Agenda for June 30, 2022 Library Session

  1. Introduction; link to this guide: guides.lib.berkeley.edu/opto/residents.
  2. Off-campus access to online resources.
  3. Asking Research Questions.
  4. Finding Articles and Keeping Up To Date.
  5. Finding Books and Other Material.
  6. Clinical Trials.
  7. Medical books.
  8. Evaluating What You Find.
  9. Citation Management.
  10. Other information:
    • Research Impact.
    • Drug Information Resources.
    • Evidence-Based Practice.
    • Research Protocols.
    • Technology and Software.
  11. Getting Help.

If You're Short on Time, Start Here

Get Books & Articles Not Owned by UC Berkeley

Click the Get it at UC Get it at UC icon button next to a citation in an article database. If it is not available online or at UC Berkeley, simply click "Request through Interlibrary Loan."

From a record in UC Library Search (the library catalog and more), simply click "Request through Interlibrary Loan."

  • Print books are delivered to the UCB library of your choice for pick up.
  • Journal articles and book chapters are shared as PDFs.
  • Articles may be delivered in a couple of days or even hours; allow up to 2 weeks for delivery, sometimes longer, for books and hard to locate items.
  • A free service for Berkeley faculty, staff, and students. No limit on number of books, articles, etc. you may request.

Off Campus Access to Library Resources

Off-campus access is limited to current UC Berkeley faculty, staff and students. Choose one of the following methods:

Library Proxy (aka EZproxy):
When you click on a link to an article, database, etc., from a library web page. you will be prompted to authenticate via CalNet.
If you click on an article (etc.) link found via a search engine or a non-UCB Library webpage, you should use this bookmarklet to access the licensed resource.

Virtual Private Network (VPN):
Download and install the VPN client to allow access the UC Berkeley licensed resources.
Make sure you select Library Access - Full Tunnel VPN when you log on.
VPN FAQ

Students: Problems setting up Library Proxy or VPN? Contact your librarian, or Student Technology Services: (510) 642-HELP, or sts-help@berkeley.edu.

Questions, questions...

Below are some examples of questions or lines of inquiry.
Considering what question a research article addresses may help you determine if it's relevant to your needs:

  • Are their racial or ethnic disparities in type 1 diabetes mellitus prevalence?
  • Compare and contrast personal versus "upstream" factors relevant to these disparities.
  • Describe examples of things that could reduce these disparities, differentiating between personal and upstream factors. 
  • If a policy or program increases disparities, what are possible reasons for this? Differentiate between personal and systemic factors.
  • Describe a plan/program/policy to reduce these disparities.
  • Justify why systemic or upstream factors contribute more to these disparities than personal factors.

What is a good Research Question? It is a question that:

  • identifies a relevant issue in your field;
  • pursues relatively uncharted research territories to address the problem;
  • piques the interest of others.

This blog post has tips on how to write a good research question, including examples of bad, good, and great questions.

What is the question being addressed in the study you are reading? Compare:

  • "Our intervention worked toward fixing Problem X."
  • "The most effective interventions for fixing Problem X are: ..."

Finding a systematic review that addresses the question you are interested in can be very helpful: take a look at the search strategy and databases used in the systematic review for tips on your search.

Public Health Librarian; Interim Optometry & Vision Science Liaison

Profile Photo
Michael Sholinbeck
(he/him)

Schedule a consultation,
or visit during my office hours
@ BPH DREAM Office (Room 2220, Berkeley Way West Bldg),
Tuesdays 4-530pm; Thursdays 130-3pm;
(Contact me for Zoom alternative).

Case Report Guidelines

Case Report Guidelines (PDF), from the American Academy of Optometry. How to prepare and write a case report, including a link a video of the 2022 Virtual Case Report Workshop.