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Earth Sciences and Map Library Exhibits: Anthropocene

New exhibits every semester.

Anthropocene: Our Current Geological Epoch

 

 

Anthropocene: Our Current Geological Epoch

Location: Earth Sciences and Map Library (50 McCone)

Reading Room

Dates: Spring Semester 2019

Curated by: Erica Newcome

The term “Anthropocene” has Greek roots (anthropo meaning “human” and –cene meaning “new”). It is a new term for an older concept, and a great deal of argument concerns how it can be differentiated, if at all, in terms of a boundary with the Holocene. It is agreed, however, that the human impact on the environment has been increasing hugely in the last few centuries and that humans are now a very potent geological force. It is also apparent that in coming centuries a combination of population increases, land cover changes, climatic changes, and new technologies will increase this force still further.

This exhibit focuses on books/e-books, videos, and online resources that discuss the Anthropocene. It also highlights materials with information on other epochs. After reviewing this guide please answer the survey below.

Goudie, Andrew. "Anthropocene." Oxford Bibliographies. , 2017, www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780199363445/obo-9780199363445-0005.xml?rskey=Bz30Ij&result=1&q=anthropocene#firstMatch. Accessed 19 Nov. 2018.

Survey

Should we call the current geological epoch we live in the Anthropocene or the Holocene?
Anthropocene: 2 votes (66.67%)
Holocene: 1 votes (33.33%)
Total Votes: 3
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​No machine-readable author provided. Navstar55 assumed (based on copyright claims). [CC BY 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Books

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